Plant microevolution and conservation in human-influenced ecosystems [E-Book] / David Briggs.
Briggs, D., (author)
Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2009
1 online resource (xix, 598 pages)
englisch
9780521818353
9780511812965
9780521521543
Full Text
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505 0 |a 1. Introduction -- 2. Studying change -- 3. Key concepts in plant evolution -- 4. The origin and extent of human-influenced habitats -- 5. Consequences of human influences on the biosphere -- 6. Categories -- 7. Investigating microevolution in anthropogenic ecosystems -- 8. Plant microevolution in managed grassland ecosystems -- 9. Harvesting crops: arable and forestry -- 10. Pollution and microevolutionary change -- 11. Introduced plants -- 12. Endangered species: investigating the extinction processes at the population level -- 13. Hybrids and speciation in anthropogenically-influenced ecosystems -- 14. Ex situ conservation: within and outside reserves -- 15. In situ conservation -- 16. Creative conservation through restoration and reintroduction -- 17. Reserves in the landscape -- 18. Climate change -- 19. Microevolution and climate change -- 20. The implications of climate change for the theory and practice of conservation -- 21. Overview. 
520 |a As human activities are increasingly domesticating the Earth's ecosystems, new selection pressures are acting to produce winners and losers amongst our wildlife. With particular emphasis on plants, Briggs examines the implications of human influences on micro-evolutionary processes in different groups of organisms, including wild, weedy, invasive, feral, and endangered species. Using case studies from around the world, he argues that Darwinian evolution is ongoing. He considers how far it is possible to conserve endangered species and threatened ecosystems through management, and questions the extent to which damaged landscapes and their plant and animal communities can be precisely recreated or restored. Many of Darwin's ideas are highlighted, including his insights into natural selection, speciation, the vulnerability of rare organisms, the impact of invasive species, and the effects of climate change on organisms. An important text for students and researchers of evolution, conservation, climate change and sustainable use of resources. 
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