Astronomy a Handbook [E-Book] / edited by Günter Dietmar Roth.
Roth, Günter Dietmar, (editor)
Berlin, Heidelberg : Springer, 1975
XVIII, 568 p. online resource.
englisch
9783642482823
10.1007/978-3-642-48282-3
Full Text
Table of Contents:
  • 1 / Introduction to Astronomical Literature and Nomenclature
  • 1.1 The Universe and the Amateur Astronomer
  • 1.2 Astronomical Literature
  • 1.3 Charts and Catalogs
  • 1.4 Almanacs
  • 1.5 Reduction of Observations
  • 2 / The Observing Instruments of the Amateur Astronomer
  • 2.1 The Performance of Astronomical Observing Instruments
  • 2.2 The Components of Astronomical Observing Instruments
  • 3 / Optical Radiation Receivers
  • 3.1 Introduction
  • 3.2 The Human Eye
  • 3.3 The Photographic Emulsion
  • 3.4 The Photoelectric Cell
  • 3.5 Television Technique
  • 4 / Radio Astronomy for Amateur Astronomers
  • 4.1 Introduction
  • 4.2 Fundamentals of Radio Astronomy
  • 4.3 The Instruments
  • 4.4 The Radio-Astronomical Objects
  • 4.5 The Instrumental Possibilities of the Amateur Astronomer
  • 5 / The Terrestrial Atmosphere and Its Effects
  • 5.1 General Remarks Concerning the Earth’s Atmosphere
  • 5.2 Weather-Dependant Phenomena
  • 5.3 Permanent Atmospheric Phenomena
  • 6 / Fundamentals of Spherical Astronomy
  • 6.1 Introduction
  • 6.2 The Coordinates
  • 6.3 The Time and the Phenomena of Daily Motion
  • 6.4 Changes in the Coordinates of a Star
  • 6.5 Calendars, Years, Julian Dates, and Normal Times
  • 6.6 Variability of the Rotation of the Earth, Ephemeris Time and the Definition of the Second
  • 6.7 Spherical Trigonometry
  • 7 / Modern Sundials
  • 7.1 Introduction
  • 7.2 The Equinoxial Sundial
  • 7.3 Design of a Horizontal Dial and of a Vertical East-West Dial
  • 7.4 The Construction of a Horizontal and a Vertical East-West Dial
  • 7.5 The Vertical Declining Dial
  • 8 / Applied Mathematics for Amateur Astronomers
  • 8.1 Introduction
  • 8.2 Theory of Errors
  • 8.3 Interpolation and Numerical Differentiation and Integration
  • 8.4 Photographic Astrometry
  • 8.5 Determination of the Position and Brightness of Planets and of the Planetographic Coordinates
  • 8.6 The Reduction of Star Occultations
  • 9 / The Sun
  • 9.1 Introduction
  • 9.2 Observation of the Sun
  • 9.3 Phenomena on the Sun’s Disc
  • 9.4 Determination of Positions of Solar Phenomena
  • 9.5 Photography of the Sun
  • 9.6 Conclusions
  • 10 / Observation of Total Solar Eclipses
  • 10.1 Photography of the Solar Corona
  • 10.2 Special Astronomical Programs
  • 10.3 Special Terrestrial Programs
  • 10.4 The Observing Station
  • 11 / The Moon
  • 11.1 Problems and Ideas of Lunar Observations
  • 11.2 Conditions of Visibility
  • 11.3 The Lunar Formations
  • 11.4 Optical Observations
  • 11.5 The Grid of Lunar Maps
  • 12 / Lunar Eclipses
  • 12.1 Introduction
  • 12.2 Prediction of Lunar Eclipses
  • 12.3 Enlargement of the Earth’s Shadow
  • 12.4 Photometry of Lunar Eclipses
  • 12.5 Photography of Lunar Eclipses
  • 13 / The Observation of Star Occultations
  • 13.1 General Remarks
  • 13.2 Predictions
  • 13.3 Optical Requirements
  • 13.4 Time Measurement
  • 13.5 Evaluation of the Observational Results
  • 13.6 Occultations of the Planets
  • 14 / Artificial Earth Satellites
  • 14.1 Nature and Purpose of the Satellites
  • 14.2 Conditions of Visibility
  • 14.3 Optical Observations
  • 14.4 Time Services
  • 14.5 Radio Observations
  • 14.6 Elementary Calculation of the Orbit
  • 14.7 Elliptical Orbits
  • 15 / The Observation of the Planets
  • 15.1 The Observation of Planetary Surfaces
  • 15.2 The Observation of the Various Planets
  • 15.3 Star Occultations by Planets
  • 15.4 The Photography of Planetary Surfaces
  • 15.5 Micrometer Measurements and Photometry of the Planetary Surfaces
  • 16 / The Observation of Comets
  • 16.1 Introductory Remarks
  • 16.2 Visual Observations
  • 16.3 Visual Determination of Position
  • 16.4 Photographic Determination of Position
  • 16.5 Observations of Cometary Structure
  • 16.6 Photometry
  • 16.7 Spectrum and Polarization
  • 17 / Meteors and Fireballs
  • 17.1 General Notes About Meteors
  • 17.2 Methods of Observation
  • 17.3 Special Observational Problems
  • 17.4 Determination of Meteor Orbits
  • 18 / Noctilucent Clouds, Aurorae, Zodiacal Light
  • 18.1 Introduction
  • 18.2 The Zodiacal Light
  • 18.3 Observation of Aurorae
  • 18.4 Noctilucent Clouds
  • 18.5 Luminous Bands
  • 18.6 The Blue Sun
  • 19 / The Photometry of Stars and Planets
  • 19.1 On the Measurement of the Sensitivity of the Eye
  • 19.2 The Photometric Capabilities of the Eye
  • 19.3 Sources of Error in the Estimation and Measurement of Brightness
  • 19.4 The Preparation of a Brightness Estimate
  • 19.5 Brightness Estimates
  • 19.6 Brightness Measurements
  • 19.7 The Reduction of Photometric Observations of Variable Stars
  • 19.8 On the Photometry of the Major Planets
  • 19.9 On the Photometry of the Minor Planets
  • 19.10 Notes on the Measurement of Colors
  • 20 / Double Stars
  • 20.1 The Visual Double Stars
  • 20.2 Micrometers and Visual Measurements
  • 20.3 Photographic Observations
  • 20.4 Orbital Elements and Ephemerides
  • 21 / The Milky Way and the Galaxies
  • 21.1 Introduction
  • 21.2 The Instruments
  • 21.3 The Most Important Objects
  • 22 / Appendix
  • 23 / Bibliography.